One of the most widely litigated issues in India is the disallowance of expenditure incurred on earning income that is exempt from tax. In an endeavor to put the controversy to rest, the Supreme Court (“SC”) in the recent case of Godrej & Boyce Manufacturing Company Ltd. v. DCIT,[1] has held that expenditure should be disallowed if it is incurred in connection with the earning of tax-exempt income.

Facts

Godrej & Boyce Manufacturing Company Limited (“Taxpayer”) is engaged in the business of manufacture of steel furniture, electrical equipments, etc. It is also a promoter of various other companies and invests funds into these companies to maintain control over them.

Continue Reading Clearing the Air: SC Confirms Disallowance of Expenses Pertaining to Exempt Income

With globalisation spreading economic activities across jurisdictions, enterprises nowadays have a presence in several jurisdictions. The taxability of activities undertaken by companies on foreign soil is closely linked to whether they are conducted through a permanent establishment (PE). This is a concept widely used in the context of international taxation wherein a particular business transaction leaves its footprint in multiple jurisdictions. Under the terms of various tax treaties, existence of a PE in the source State is a pre-requisite to hold a non-resident liable to pay taxes on business profits. The term PE is generally defined in the tax treaties as “a fixed place of business through which the business of a foreign enterprise is carried on wholly or in part”.

Under the various tax treaties executed with other countries, India imposes tax on any business income accruing or arising to a non-resident, whether directly or indirectly through or from any PE in India.

Continue Reading Formula One: SC Lays Down the Formula for Permanent Establishment

Indian income tax law exempts long-term capital gains arising from transfer of listed equity shares provided such transfer takes place through the stock exchange, and securities transaction tax (STT) is paid. However, the Government believes that this exemption is being misused by certain unscrupulous elements to convert unaccounted money into legal money. The law was therefore recently amended to remedy the situation, restricting this benefit only to such cases where STT is paid both at the time of purchase as well as sale.

However, since this amendment is being introduced as an anti-abuse provision, it also provided that the Government would notify certain types of acquisitions where this restrictive provision would not apply so that genuine business transactions are not impacted.

A draft notification has recently been issued by the Central Board of Direct Taxes (CBDT) attempting to list out such instances and inviting comments from stakeholders. Through this blogpost, we will discuss the efficacy and appropriateness of this draft notification.

Draft CBDT Notification

As discussed above, the recent amendment provides that the capital gains exemption shall be available only in such cases where STT is paid both at the time of purchase as well as at the sale of such listed shares, unless the shares were acquired through a mechanism which has specifically been notified to be unaffected by this provision. In other words, the import of this provision is very wide and could deny capital gains exemption to all such instances unless the notification exempts them. To protect genuine business transactions, the Government has been empowered to come up with instances where the exemption will not be denied. Hence, the nature of transactions to be specified by the notification shall be very important to determine the taxability of capital gains.

Continue Reading Draft CBDT Notification on Withdrawal of Capital Gains Exemption – Clearing the Maze or Further Compounding it

The Finance Bill 2017 proposes certain significant amendments in respect of the direct tax regime, especially in the area of M&A and restructuring / reorganisation. While some of the suggested changes are designed to ensure that the provisions are not abused by taxpayers through aggressive tax planning, the Finance Bill also attempts to provide much needed clarity on certain long-standing issues. This blog post briefly deals with some of the key points regarding restructuring / reorganisation and M&A transactions. Continue Reading M&A and Internal Restructuring – Providing Clarity & Plugging Loopholes

India has time and again shown its commitment to curbing base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS), an initiative of the Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the G20 nations. The Finance Act 2016 is testimony to this fact as it enabled the introduction of an equalisation levy, country-by-country reporting and the Indian patent box regime. The Government has been continuously revising various tax treaties to plug loopholes, strengthen information sharing between the contracting states and prevent double non-taxation under the garb of avoidance of double taxation.

In continuation of the Government’s support of the BEPS project, the Finance Bill 2017 proposes to introduce measures to curb thin capitalisation in India. Continue Reading Thin Capitalisation – The Line Is Getting Blurred!